The Entertainment Guide

The Guides

Over the years our annual printed publication has become the definitive guide for tourists, locals and business people looking for inspiration to help them plan and organise an exciting day or evening out.

The Entertainment Guide features a huge and eclectic choice of restaurants, bistros, cafes, bars, clubs, shops, salons, spas, hotels, tourist attractions and much, much more. From a romantic meal for two, a business lunch or a weekend away, The Entertainment Guide provides a fantastic choice to suit every taste and occasion.

Click your chosen area to view the online guide.


Aberdeen

Aberdeen is not called one of Britain’s ‘most architecturally distinctive cities’ for nothing. Beneath its imposing buildings and granite exterior though, visitors will find a warm welcome and surprising hidden depths.

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Ayrshire

Ayrshire is shaped like a great crescent moon, curving around gorgeous coastline and centring on the idyllic seaside town of Ayr. Sandy beaches and rocky outcrops combine with historic landmarks, towering castles and, of course, the chance to indulge in one of the country’s most famous sports – golf.

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Bath

Every British major city can boast of being steeped in history, but Bath is one conurbation with no need to show off. Its storied past, wrapped in Roman architecture, romantic literature and rolling countryside, speaks for itself. The hot springs, Georgian buildings, literary heroes, temples and statues are all reason enough to make the pilgrimage to Somerset, but upon arrival, there’s a whole lot more to make you stay.

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Belfast

For its industry and architecture, its history and character, there's no place like Belfast. Pick a metric – any metric – and the Northern Irish capital can claim distinction. From the dockyards, where the Titanic Quarter lies, to the residential streets daubed with political murals, you don't have to search for Belfast's story: it's literally engraved onto the bewitching city, greeting you at every twist and turn.

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Birmingham

When pressed to name the UK’s largest city outside of London, most Brits will instinctively respond with Liverpool or Manchester. The truth is, that the accolade goes to Birmingham with in excess of 1.1 million residents, a figure that is growing rapidly. The West Midlands city is blessed with a rich history and a vibrant present, one that’s seen it become a centre of excellence for Michelin-star dining, live music and the arts.

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Brighton

As the quintessential seaside resort, Brighton is married to the sea. With London just an hour away, it is, after all, the closest point of call for many Brits eager to escape to the coast. But it’s not just its proximity that lures Londoners to the south-east resort; Brighton’s charms extend to much more than the sea breeze and salt spray whipped off the English Channel. Colourful, vibrant, creative, eclectic: pick a superlative and you’ll find ample evidence to fit the description in the bustling resort where the nights, like the days, fly past in a kaleidoscopic blur of eye-popping sights and myriad sounds.

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Bristol

Where the Severn Estuary nears the Bristol Channel lies a Roman city once famed for its exquisite architecture and intrepid seafarers. Today, Bristol’s economy is more tied to its creative media and aerospace industries, but those imperious buildings still stand, uncowed by the ravages of weather and time. “Creative” is a word you’ll hear a lot as you explore this Roman city: Bristolians are a creative, free-thinking bunch. It’s also a place where tourists go to marvel at the culture, revel in the nightlife and savour the award-winning gastropubs and restaurants.

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Cambridge

With a storied history dating back to the Bronze Age, Cambridge is a fascinating city, regardless of the era you choose to hone in on. There was a major settlement here in Roman times, but it was under Viking rule that Cambridge became a major trading post. Fascinating as its ancient history is, the city is of course best known as a seat of learning and for the iconic buildings that delineate its skyline.

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Cardiff

Where the River Taff meets the Severn Estuary, the UK’s 11th largest city lies, but to describe it in such quantitative terms does not even begin to do it justice. The Welsh capital since 1955, Cardiff is a hub of sports and music, food and comedy and all of life’s other great pleasures, from cocktails to castles. The home of the national opera, theatre and dance companies, which are all incorporated into Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff is many things to many people.

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Carlisle

Immerse yourself in a whirlwind of culture and entertainment whilst visiting the historic city of Carlisle, county capital of Cumbria. Whether you’re looking for nightlife or a relaxed holiday with the kids, Carlisle and its surrounding areas provide something special for everyone.

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Central

Central Scotland is a sometimes forgotten strip nestled between the bustling cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, and just below the Highlands. Yet it has plenty to offer with a wealth of charming scenery, historic landmarks and a variety of attractions, restaurants and shopping experiences.

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Dublin

You can't talk about Dublin without talking about the Liffey. It bifurcates the city, separating the north from the south and providing respite from the thronged backstreets and alleyways that run all the way to the water's edge. When the bustle of inner-city life becomes too intense, pause on one of the Liffey's footbridges and catch your breath. The water may be bitterly cold, but the view along the waterfront is deeply enchanting. Of the many crossings to span the river, perhaps the greatest is James Joyce Bridge, named after the city's most famous literary son.

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Dundee & St Andrews

Along the east coast of Scotland, where the sun sparkles off the water, you’ll find two of Scotland’s most intriguing spots: the bustling city of Dundee and the historic town of St Andrews. Very different at first glance, yet both packed with attractions, entertainment and culture. If you’re heading along the coast then it’s well worth trying to fit them both into your visit.

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Edinburgh

Edinburgh’s one of those cities that, even if you’ve never been there, you feel like you know it. You don’t know that unforgettable yeasty brewery aroma till it hits you, upon alighting at Haymarket, any more than you know what the roar sounds like as the teams emerge into the cauldron of Murrayfield on matchday.

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Glasgow

How best to describe Glasgow? A city of infinite possibilities and endless stories. A dense urban sprawl, bifurcated by the dark waters of the Clyde. High rises and low hills. Green spaces and orange bricks. Scotland’s largest city, coloured by its flamboyant characters and red sandstone edifices.

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Highlands & Islands

Scotland boasts mesmerising landscapes, rich history and world-renowned nightlife and entertainment, but the Highlands and Islands are arguably the piece de resistance. This unique part of the world caters for every type of explorer, whether you’re interested in awakening your inner adventurer or relaxing in a luxury hotel having a well-earned rest. No matter what your perfect holiday consists of, the Highlands and Islands has something to suit.

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Inverness

Inverness. The capital of the Highlands. The mouth of the River Ness. The seat of endless history and intrigue. Whereas once its streets resonated to the clash of swords and stomp of marching boots, today it's a modern, forward-thinking place; a city that's proud of its past, but firmly embracing the present. With a plethora of outdoor activities, a bustling college and, in Caledonian Thistle FC, a Scottish Premiership side who are riding high, Inverness is on the up. That is was recently declared Scotland's happiest place to live is testament to its ascendancy.

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Lanarkshire

To the South-East of Glasgow lies a county of bucolic beauty interspersed with a ribbon of bustling towns and villages. Lanarkshire is as prized for its rolling hills and sprawling country estates as it is for its quaint tearooms, gastropubs, festivals and fairs. It takes a lot to lure Glasgow’s dining set away from the city, but thanks to a handful of acclaimed restaurants and chic bistros, Lanarkshire attracts swathes of the city’s discerning diners every weekend.

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Liverpool

The city of Liverpool means different things to different people. The birthplace of British guitar music. The embodiment of Northern soul and grit. The onramp for the Irish diaspora who’ve left their mark on British culture since emigrating in their droves in the 19th century.

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Manchester

Manchester is a classic case of a city that’s reinvented itself. Once a northern industrial stronghold, it now serves as a cosmopolitan northern playground that’s prized for its memorable nightlife, including some of the best pubs in the country.

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Newcastle

Seven bridges and a sea of shimmering lights, sparkling on the Tyne’s dark waters, bifurcate the famous city of Newcastle. It’s a city that occupies a special place in the hearts of its residents and temporary guests. Whether living there as a student, partying there for a stag weekend or passing through on business, the North East stronghold exerts a strong pull. It’s enough to ensure your first visit to Newcastle won’t be your last; the dual conurbations of Newcastle and Gateshead lure visitors year after year, returning to cement old memories and embed new ones.

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Oxford

London might serenade the shoppers and Edinburgh the castle crowds, but for many UK visitors there’s one city that trumps them all. One city whose architecture, culture, education and literary heritage is unsurpassed. It’s affectionately known as The City of Dreaming Spires and its home is in the county of Oxfordshire.

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Sheffield

Long before the first tourists flocked to Sheffield (England’s third largest district by population), it was prized for pioneering advancements in industry, with steel its stronghold. Today, Sheffield’s industrial might has been tempered by a gentler side that has attracted visitors from across the British Isles and beyond, lured by the green spaces, constituting over 60% of the city, and the Peak District national park it abuts. With over 250 parks, woodlands and gardens, Sheffield is an urban city wrapped in a bucolic vista.

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Swansea

It might not be the UK’s most populous city, but for short breaks and beach holidays, Swansea is in a class of its own. Family holidays and couples’ romantic getaways all start in Swansea Bay, whose steep cliffs and golden sands give way to a peninsula that can be as calm as glass on a summer’s day.

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